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  • Writer's pictureSteve Navarrete

PRIVATE INVESTIGATIONS - The Basics

Updated: May 16, 2023



Investigations can be thought of as a systematic and methodical process of defining a problem, gathering information, analyzing it, drawing conclusions, and then communicating the results so that an informed decision can be made.


DEFINING THE PROBLEM

Defining the problem is the first and one of the most important steps in any investigation. Clearly state what needs to be investigated and what outcome is desired. Identify why the investigation is being conducted or the goal of the investigation. This is when the timeframe and deadline are also identified. This will have a direct effect on the scope of the investigation and what specific questions need to be answered in order to solve the problem or address the issue being investigated. Defining the problem in a clear and precise manner helps identify what resources will be required to conduct the investigation, such as personnel, equipment, and funding, to ensure that the investigation is focused, efficient, and effective. It also provides a roadmap for the investigation, guiding the process and helping to ensure that all relevant information is gathered and analyzed.


GATHERING INFORMATION

Collect relevant data and evidence through various sources, such as interviews, records, or observations. Gathering this information helps to build a complete picture of the problem or issue being investigated. A good place to start is by Identifying relevant sources of information such as records, interviews, observations, or physical evidence. Take care to preserve the integrity of the evidence and maintain a chain of custody when applicable, with items such as physical evidence. Next, organize and catalog the information. Then, verify the information, and document the process by keeping a record of how the information was obtained, who was involved, and any relevant details about the process. This process can be time-consuming and tedious but it is essential for conducting a thorough investigation. The quality and reliability of the information gathered will have a direct impact on the accuracy and validity of the conclusions drawn from the investigation.

ANALYZING INFORMATION

Examining the data and evidence to identify patterns, relationships, and potential causes.


Carefully read through the information collected to gain an understanding of the problem or issue being investigated. Organize and sort the information into categories based on relevance and importance to the investigation. Identify patterns and relationships in the information to determine potential causes and solutions to the problem being investigated. Evaluate the evidence by assessing the quality and reliability of the information and evidence to determine their relevance and significance to the investigation. Draw tentative conclusions based on the analysis, forming tentative conclusions about the cause of the problem or issue being investigated. Finally, test your tentative conclusions against additional evidence or through additional analysis to determine their accuracy and validity.

Most importantly of all, approach the analysis objectively and systematically, avoiding biases or preconceived notions that may cloud the interpretation of the data.


DRAWING CONCLUSIONS

Based on the analysis, determining the most likely explanation or solution to the problem or question being investigated.


Drawing conclusions is the final step in the investigation process, where the findings of the investigation are used to determine the most likely explanation or solution to the problem or question being investigated. This is when the investigator goes over the results of the analysis to ensure that all relevant information has been considered and asses the quality and reliability of the information and evidence to determine their relevance and significance to the investigation. If it all checks out, the investigator should be able to formulate conclusions about the cause of the problem or issue being investigated. The investigator should test the conclusion against additional evidence or analysis when possible to determine their accuracy and validity. The conclusions drawn will have far-reaching consequences and should be based on sound reasoning and evidence. Once again, it is important to be objective and impartial when drawing conclusions, avoiding biases or preconceived notions that may cloud the interpretation of the data.


COMMUNICATING RESULTS

Presenting the findings of the investigation in a clear and concise manner to relevant parties.


Findings are to be shared with relevant parties and used to make informed decisions. Ensure findings and conclusions are clear and well-supported. Determine who needs to be informed of the results of the investigation and how they will be impacted by the findings. For example, if the investigator found damning information in a marital infidelity case, the investigator should be sensitive but professional in communicating the findings to the client. The investigator should choose the most appropriate format for presenting the results, such as a written report, presentation, or meeting. Communicate the results in a clear and professional manner, using language and visual aids that are easily understood by the client. Anticipate questions and concerns and address them up front.


A follow-up at a later date to ensure that the results of the investigation are fully understood and acted upon is only appropriate in limited circumstances so the investigator must use their best discretion here. The big takeaway is that communicating the results of an investigation is an opportunity to inform and educate others about the findings, as well as to build trust and credibility. It is important to approach the communication process with care and professionalism, presenting the results in a clear and impartial manner. The quality and accuracy of the communication can have a significant impact on the outcomes and consequences of the investigation.


It's important to note that investigations can be conducted in a variety of fields, including criminal investigations, workplace investigations, and scientific investigations, among others, and the specifics of the process can vary depending on the context and the nature of the problem being investigated.


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